Lenton Times

The Magazine of Lenton Local History Society

 

Gregory Street - Lenton



Abbey Street to Derby Road | Abbey Street to Lenton Lane | Lenton Listener Archive | Family Memories | Memories of Trevethick's | Street Map



Gregory Street - Abbey Street to Derby Road
Click on each photograph below  to show the enlarged version 

 

Photographs assembled in sequence starting from Abbey Street through to Derby Road

 

 

Photograph by Paul Bexon - 2004

 

Photograph from Lenton Local History Society Collection

 

Photograph from Lenton Local History Society Collection

 

 

The Gregory Street Abbey Street junction in 2004.  The building on the corner, currently operating as a takeaway food outlet, was originally the No.1 branch shop of the Lenton & Nottingham Co-operative Society.

 

Undated photograph of properties opposite White Hart on the corner of Gregory Street and Abbey Street.

 

Looking at Gregory Street from Abbey Street in June 1996.

 

 

 

  Photograph from Lenton Local History Society Collection

 

Photograph courtesy of Lenton Local History Society

 

Photograph from Stephen Zaleski's Collection

 

 

Leen Gate to the left and St Anthony's Court properties in the background in June 1996

 

A 1996 view of The White Hart with the portion of the pub that once served as the Peveril prison just visible between the two hawthorn bushes. See also Lenton Listener Article - Porridge in Lenton

 

A picture postcard by J Spree, first published in 1919, showing Gregory Street looking northwards.  Just out of the picture off to the left would be the junction with Leen Gate.

 

 

 

Photograph from Lenton Local History Society Collection

 

Photograph from Lenton Local History Society Collection

 

  Photograph from Lenton Local History Society Collection

 

 

Much the same view as the previous shot possibly taken in the 1930's. The building in the foreground is No.26.  Beyond it is No.24 occupied by the Shaw family and in the distance Ball's butcher's shop (No.22). Two of the children in the photo are Angela and Christine Swinscoe.  

 

Undated photograph, but probably taken in the 1970's, showing property at the junction of Gregory Street and Church Street.

 

View of Saxon Green in 1992

 

 

 

Photograph from Lenton Local History Society Collection

 

Photograph from Lenton Local History Society Collection

 

  Photograph from Lenton Local History Society Collection

 

 

Undated photograph showing The Old Manor House

 

Gregory Street under flood in the 1980s.  The house situated at the junction of Gregory Street and Church Street is on the left and in the middle distance is Rose Neath

 

1938 Newspaper photograph showing construction of surface water drain running along Gregory Street

 

 

 

Photograph from Lenton Local History Society Collection

 

Photograph from Lenton Local History Society Collection 

 

Photograph from Lenton Local History Society Collection 

 

 

Picture postcard from the early 1900s looking south down Gregory Street with the Old Manor House on the left

 

This property stood at the corner of Gregory street and Derby Road. The ground floor windows have already been boarded up prior to its subsequent demolition to make way for the Gregory Court maisonettes.
This and the companion shot displayed under Derby Road, of admittedly poor quality, are the only shots the Society has of this building.

 

Junction of Gregory Street and Derby Road, with one of the Gregory Court properties visible on the right.  Photograph from 1992.

 

 

Gregory Street - Abbey Street to Trent Lane (Lenton Lane)
Click on each photograph below  to show the enlarged version
 

 

Photograph from Lenton Local History Society Collection

 

Photograph courtesy of Dave Jewell 

 

Photograph courtesy of Mollie Farrell 

 

 

Picture postcard from the early 1900s taken outside The White Hart.  The properties in the middle distance are Mart's Yard.
See also Lenton Listener Article - Porridge in Lenton

 

Letter head relating to Jewell's Garage which operated in the building shown in the next photograph.  Click on the photograph for more information about this particular business.

 

An undated photograph showing Bott's Garage which could be found at the corner of Gregory Street and Abbey Bridge.  The story of this is featured in the recollections of Mollie Farrell.
See The Botts of Old Church Street in Lenton Times No.17

 

 

 

Photograph from Lenton Local History Society Collection 

 

Photograph courtesy of Carol Williams 

 

Photograph from Lenton Local History Society Collection 

 

 

 A view of the Gregory Street junction with Abbey Bridge taken after Bott's Garage has been demolished but before the arrival of the Red Cross headquarters.  This would probably date the photograph to the early 1970s.

 

A group of local girls (named on the large version) posing for their photograph behind No.54 Gregory Street in the very early 1960s.

 

The original Red Cow public house.  Photograph taken in the 1950s.

 

 

 

Photograph courtesy of Glenys Randle 

 

Photograph from Lenton Local History Society Collection 

 

Photograph from Lenton Local History Society Collection 

 

 

Albert and Ada Marriott (standing on the left) pose for their photograph with friends and relations in the garden of their home at 33 Gregory Street in May 1958.  For those who don't know the individuals in question the interest lies in what can be seen in the background namely the original Red Cow public house and the adjoining blocks of housing.

 

The old Red Cow can be seen in the middle distance and from the state of the properties in the foreground this photograph would appear to have been taken shortly before the demolition men moved in.

 

The new Red Cow was built at the rear of the original property and on completion the old building was demolished and the site used for car parking.  Photograph taken in the 1990s.

 

 

 

Photograph from Lenton Local History Society Collection 

 

Photograph by Stephen Zaleski 

 

Photograph from Lenton Local History Society Collection 

 

 

This footpath runs between Gregory Street and Grove Road.  Until its rerouting in the 1960s the River Leen would have run alongside it just on the other side of the righthand set of railings.  These have since been removed and the ground levelled as part of environmental improvements carried out in the 1990s.

 

As can be seen from the sign on the wall, this young man is walking past the entrance to Trevethick's boat yard.  The property in the photograph, taken in the early 1980s, was subsequently demolished in the 1990s to make way for the new canalside properties.
 See also Trevethick's Boat Yard

 

An undated view of Clayton's Bridge which linked Gregory Street with Trent Lane (now called Lenton Lane).  The bridge has now been replaced by a more modern structure.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Photograph from Lenton Local History Society Collection 

 

 

 

 

An early twentieth century picture postcard from the 'Clumber' series showing Clayton's Bridge viewed from the east.

 

A 1980 view of the Poplars, a property that was to be found on Gregory Street/Lenton Lane just next to the canal.  From the photograph it is evident that the building was now unoccupied and uncared for in the period immediately prior to its demolition.  The site is now occupied by Thomas Cork SM Ltd.  Photograph taken by Stanley Wilson.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Trevethick's Boat Yard - Gregory Street
 

 

 

 

 

Photograph from Lenton Local History Society Collection

 

 

 

 

 

 

  The view from Trevethick's boatyard looking towards Gregory Street/Lenton Lane.  In the far distance are the properties known as 'The Poplars' featured elsewhere on this page. Photo taken by Stanley Wilson in 1976

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Photograph from Lenton Local History Society Collection

Photograph by Paul Bexon

Photograph by Paul Bexon

 

 

The dry dock 1976

 

The canal side at Trevethick's Boatyard in 1983

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Photograph by Chris Jackson 1985

 

 

Photograph by Chris Noble

 

 

At one time Trevethick's boatyard housed what had once been an electric tram.  Originally a double-decked vehicle here it has been reduced to a single-deck.  Photograph taken by Chris Jackson in 1985.

 

Clearly this shot is not taken on Gregory Street or at Trevethick's boatyard. It does, however, show what the vehicle in the previous photograph would have looked like when it was up and running. The door in the 1985 shot is clearly a later addition.

 

Chris Noble took this shot of part of Trevethick's boatyard in the early 1980s.  In the ensuing years the colour tones of Chris's master copy have undergone a change.  We have tried to recover those original colours although the sheds themselves may not have been quite this particular shade of pink.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

May 2004

 

 

 Photograph by Paul Bexon - May 2004

 

Photograph by Paul Bexon - May 2004

 

Photograph by Paul Bexon - May 2004 

 

 

These three photographs were all taken from the canal towpath looking across at Trevethicks boatyard.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Photograph by Paul Bexon - May 2004

 

Photograph by Paul Bexon - May 2004

 

 Photograph by Paul Bexon - May 2004

 

 

The view looking towards the Gregory Street bridge showing the rear of the properties which constitute Clayton's Drive.

 

The Clayton's Drive properties seen from the front.  These houses were erected on part of Clayton's Wharf in the 1990s.

 

Back in Trevethick's dry dock with two boats receiving some tender loving care.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Photograph by Paul Bexon - May 2004 

 

Photograph by Paul Bexon - May 2004

 

Photograph by Paul Bexon - May 2004

 

 

A close up of the right-hand bay with Colin Rawlson's son giving the outside of the boat a new coat of paint.

 

Colin Rawlson inherited Trevethick's boat repair yard following the death of Tom Trevethick. Colin can be seen here in one of the sheds alongside a boat currently undergoing renovation.

 

Colin Rawlson and the boat shown in the previous photograph but shot from the opposite end of the vessel.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Photograph by Paul Bexon - May 2004

 

Photograph courtesy of Lenton Listener

 

 

 

 

The right-hand photo shows Tom Trevethick posing beside the partially completed hull of a boat under construction in 1981.  The left-hand photo shows that same boat some twenty three years later.  Tom Trevethick died before it could be completed.  Since then whenever Colin Rawlson's work schedule permits it, a bit more work is done on the boat.  The last time was some seven years ago so it is any one's guess as to when the boat will finally make its maiden voyage.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

See also The Tom Trevethick Story

Memories of Trevethick's

 

‘Dodger’ Radford - Hull
My dad worked on the boats down on the Trent from 1947 to the early 1950s and, although just a little lad, I used to go along and help.  Dad drove a boat called ‘Chatnor’ moored at Tom Trevethick’s landing stageThe Trevethick fleet at the Victoria Embankment c.1950.  Photograph Courtesy of Tom Trevethick on Victoria Embankment while Mrs T. collected the money as they came down the gang plank.  She also used to let out the rowing boats which cost 3 shillings with a 5 bob returnable deposit.  I used to help out either on the ‘Success’ with Tom or on the ‘Princess Victory’ which was the next boat along run by the Brookhouses. Just beyond Trent Bridge were some more boats belonging to C. Bagguley, a big fat bloke.  His boats were called ‘Playmate’, ‘Western Lady’ and ‘Ballerina’.  I used to help him out in school holidays and on summer evenings running trips to Colwick Park or upstream to Wilford power station.  Across the river, next to the rowing clubs, was Percy Taylor’s, the boat builders. Colin Rawlson, who now runs Trevethick’s boat yard, got his first job there as a boat builder if I remember correctly. I also seem to recall that Colin did a number of trips employed as a galley boy on trawlers working out of Grimsby.

Back in 1947 when I was seven my nick-name was ‘Dodger’ and we lived at 5 Grove Villas, Wilford Grove in The Meadows.  However for the past 53 years [2008] I have lived in Hull. A friend of mine who lives nearby me in Hull bought the 'Pride of the Yare' from Yarmouth and the co-incidence is that this boat was also once based on the Trent at Nottingham.

 

Lenton Listener Archive
Articles from 'The Lenton Listener' Magazine

The Tom Trevethick Story - Issue 13 (Jul - Aug 1981)
Porridge at Lenton - Issue 28 (Apr - May 1984)
The Priory Park - Issue 31 (Nov - Dec 1984)

 

Family Memories

 

Jean Button
One of the people I remember who lived on Gregory Street was Mr Derry of Derry the Printers [Arthur Derry – No.10 Gregory Street].  He had what I recall was a large cottage-type house with a big garden.  In the 1940s, one of our neighbours who lived on Marcus Street, a Mrs Wilson, used to clean his house and sometimes she would take me and her daughter, Margaret, along with her.  Once there, we would be allowed to play in the garden.  I used to dream of having a home like that when I grew up.  Eventually I did, when we went to live in Fountain Cottage in Strelley village.

Mary Isaac’s (Rose Mary Dobson)
My parents, Vera & Len Dobson, moved to Lenton in early 1950.  We lived at ‘The Poplars’, the house at the side of the canal on Lenton  Lane, which used to be Trent Lane. My Mum, who is now aged 90 [2007] was the last to leave the house in June 1980.  Soon after this the house was demolished and its site and the sports field that lay behind it were commandeered for the Thomas Cork buildings. During the summer holidays the young lads from Gregory Street and surrounding areas used to dive off the old humpback bridge into the canal to cool off. I can recall one foggy winter day, as I was going to school, the postman came over the  bridge on his bike and missed our gate and landed up in the canal instead – letters and all. I also remember the great bonfires - and hot potatoes - held across the road from the Red Cow Pub.

Penny Heeley
In the late 40s and early 50s my Aunt, Frances Foster, ran the White Hart. Her daughter, Marjorie, died of  T.B. at a young age , and Auntie Fran had a window commissioned and placed in the church at Lenton Abbey.

sftatam@aol.com
I lived in the White Hart as a child - that was about 26 years ago.  I was absolutely terrified to go into the prison part of the pub, as people used to say that they heard a man singing in the mens toilets of the pub.  Apparently his name was Lol!  I also found out the person who ran the prison was called Pearson.

Bill Prosser - Toronto, Canada
My father`s family came from Lenton. He was born at 15 Gregory St. in 1892. My grandfather, George Prosser,was a blacksmith, and had the contract to shoe all the horses for the Player`s Tobacco Company.

 

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